The Long Walk 2nd Anniversary Scrapbook

My name is Leonard James, I am a secondary Science teacher at a comprehensive school in England. I have been teaching for eight years and have been promoted to middle leadership during this time. The Long Walk is an outlet for my personal concerns and frustrations about British education. Here I outline said concerns and provide links to the archive of blogposts.

The educational establishment

A circus sits at the summit of the British education systems managemental hierarchy. It is a toxic mix of empire building CEOs, consultants, gurus, bureaucrats and politicians. They are divorced from, and therefore ignorant about, the everyday business of schools. They manage from afar via endless specifications, targets and compliance checking. The following series of blogs highlight some of the unintended consequences of this management style:

Task Saturation

Educational Platitudes #4: ‘..we’ve all taught a crap lesson’

Claim your College: Three questions from a sceptic

Thoughts from the Frontline: Stress

Verbal Irony: Nicky Morgan writes about government reform

Mixed Bag: The Paradixical Tenure of Education Secretary Gove

Educational Platitudes #1: ‘Kayliegh wants to do well’

What do Ofsted have to say about Science curriculums?

Ofsted Data Dashboards: Spot the Difference

Methods for Attaining League Table Altitude

%5 A*-C inc EM

Mandatory Optimism

ERSC Miss the Elephant in the Room

Minions of Ofsted Part 1: High Stakes Lesson Observations

Minions of Ofsted Part 2: Learning Walks

Minions of Ofsted Part 3: The Consultants

The New Ofsted Data Dashboards Reward Science Departments who Game the Examination System

School choice, competition and the Free Market

The problems described above are exacerbated by personalities within the educational establishment who can’t get along. Some members of the educational establishment are monetarists (mainly CEOs and some politicians) pushing for an education system based on free market principles. The following posts describe how teachers and their work are or might be affected by this sort of thinking:

On the DfE Academies and Autonomy Report Part 1: Poor Methodology

Educational Platitudes #3: ‘aiming for excellence..’

On the Staffroom Debate

Educational Platitudes #2: ‘I’m passionate about…’

Injecting Competition: A response to Gabriel Sahlgren and Julian Le Grand

Teaching is a McJob Part 1: Low Pay

Teaching is a McJob Part 2: Low Prestige

Teaching is a McJob Part 3: No Training

Progressive education

Many of those within the educational establishment (who are described by Michael Gove as ‘the blob’) reject liberal education in favour of child centered ‘progressive’ pedagogy. This pedagogy undermines the authority of adults, has contributed to a national behaviour crisis and is detrimental to learning:

On the October Twitterstorm: “No Excuses” Charters

On the Gove Rogue Meme

A Response to Mitra Part 1: Education and Employability

A Response to Mitra Part 2: Classroom Pedagogy

A Response to Mitra Part 3: The Past

Science education

The following posts are specifically about Science education. This wonderful subject has been routed by endless change, poorly targeted investment and a haemorrhaging of in school expertise.

Practical Work in Science Part 1: Three Reasons Why ISAs Must Die

Practical Work in Science Part 2: Beyond the blundering headlines

Practical Work in Science Part 3: I’m actually paying for this!

Miscellaneous

Meet the parents…


The Long Walk 1st Anniversary Scrapbook

My name is Leonard James, I am a secondary Science teacher at a comprehensive school in England. I have been teaching for eight years and have been promoted to middle leadership during this time. The Long Walk is an outlet for my personal concerns and frustrations about British education. Here I outline said concerns and provide links to the archive of blogposts.

The educational establishment

The educational establishment sits at the summit of the British education systems managemental hierarchy. It is a toxic mix of empire building CEOs, consultants, gurus, bureaucrats and politicians. They are divorced from, and therefore ignorant about, the everyday business of schools. They manage from afar via endless specifications, targets and compliance checking. The following series of blogs highlight some of the unintended consequences of this management style:

Educational Platitudes #1: 'Kayliegh wants to do well'

What do Ofsted have to say about Science curriculums?

Ofsted Data Dashboards: Spot the Difference

Methods for Attaining League Table Altitude

%5 A*-C inc EM

Mandatory Optimism

ERSC Miss the Elephant in the Room

Minions of Ofsted Part 1: High Stakes Lesson Observations

Minions of Ofsted Part 2: Learning Walks

Minions of Ofsted Part 3: The Consultants

The New Ofsted Data Dashboards Reward Science Departments who Game the Examination System

School choice, competition and the Free Market

The problems described above are exacerbated by personalities within the educational establishment who can't get along. Some members of the educational establishment are monetarists (mainly CEOs and some politicians) pushing for an education system based on free market principles. The following posts describe how teachers and their work are or might be affected by this sort of thinking:

On the Staffroom Debate

Educational Platitudes #2: 'I'm passionate about…'

Injecting Competition: A response to Gabriel Sahlgren and Julian Le Grand

Teaching is a McJob Part 1: Low Pay

Teaching is a McJob Part 2: Low Prestige

Teaching is a McJob Part 3: No Training

Progressive education

Many of those within the educational establishment (who are described by Michael Gove as 'the blob') reject liberal education in favour of child centered 'progressive' pedagogy. This pedagogy undermines the authority of adults, has contributed to a national behaviour crisis and is detrimental to learning:

A Response to Mitra Part 1: Education and Employability

A Response to Mitra Part 2: Classroom Pedagogy

A Response to Mitra Part 3: The Past